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Suicide Prevention Lifeline

Moving from Pain to Possibilities

In partnership with the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, Greater Twin Cities United Way offers suicide prevention support and mental health crisis intervention to callers throughout Minnesota. The service is available 24/7 for everyone and is free and confidential at:

1-800-273-TALK or 1-800-273-8255

If you, or someone you know, is struggling with suicide:

Call 1-800-273-TALK (1-800-273-8255) for immediate support.

Our Impact to Date

The data below represents calls received since the suicide prevention lifeline launched in January 2021.

90

calls per day

11,000+

people served

~10%

of callers are under 15

90

calls per day

11,000+

people served

~10%

of callers are under 15

90

calls per day

11,000+

people served

~10%

of callers are under 15

Helping People Find Hope

The last few years have been extremely hard on our community, with many of our neighbors facing overwhelming challenges. The impact on mental health has been deep and wide-ranging — affecting people of all ages. That’s why, based on the efficacy of our 211 resource helpline infrastructure, the Minnesota Department of Health awarded Greater Twin Cities United Way a $4.2 million grant to develop, launch and provide ongoing suicide prevention support and mental health crisis intervention as a Minnesota-based partner in the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (NSPL).

The free suicide prevention lifeline is available 24/7 and is staffed by skilled crisis counselors who are trained to listen to callers, understand how their problem is affecting them, provide support and get each caller the help they need.

What We Do

The suicide prevention lifeline program is responsible for providing free and confidential suicide risk assessment, emotional support, crisis intervention and referrals to local treatment and support resources, including emergency services. Our specialists help callers explore difficult feelings, assess their risk of suicide and develop a safety plan for the future, which often includes linking the caller to local resources.

Why We Do It

Our highly-trained, empathetic specialists answer about 90 calls per day with the goal of preventing suicide. Many of the callers are seriously considering taking their own lives. Others seek help for loved ones who may be at risk of suicide. Our lifeline specialists help callers explore options that can reduce distress and hopelessness in their lives.

Learn More

When to Call

(citation: the following info “Know the Risk Factors” and “Know the Warning Signs” is taken from suicidepreventionlifeline.org)

Know the Risk Factors

Risk factors are characteristics that make it more likely that someone will consider, attempt or die by suicide. They can’t cause or predict a suicide attempt, but they’re important to be aware of.

  • Mental disorders, particularly mood disorders, schizophrenia, anxiety disorders, and certain personality disorders
  • Alcohol and other substance use disorders
  • Hopelessness
  • Impulsive and/or aggressive tendencies
  • History of trauma or abuse
  • Major physical illnesses
  • Previous suicide attempt(s)
  • Family history of suicide
  • Job or financial loss
  • Loss of relationship(s)
  • Easy access to lethal means
  • Local clusters of suicide
  • Lack of social support and sense of isolation
  • Stigma associated with asking for help
  • Lack of healthcare, especially mental health and substance abuse treatment
  • Cultural and religious beliefs, such as the belief that suicide is a noble resolution of a personal dilemma
  • Exposure to others who have died by suicide (in real life or via the media and Internet)

Know the Warning Signs

Some warning signs may help you determine if a loved one is at risk for suicide, especially if the behavior is new, has increased, or seems related to a painful event, loss, or change. If you or someone you know exhibits any of these, seek help by calling 1-800-273-8255.

  • Talking about wanting to die or to kill themselves
  • Looking for a way to kill themselves, like searching online or buying a gun
  • Talking about feeling hopeless or having no reason to live
  • Talking about feeling trapped or in unbearable pain
  • Talking about being a burden to others
  • Increasing the use of alcohol or drugs
  • Acting anxious or agitated; behaving recklessly
  • Sleeping too little or too much
  • Withdrawing or isolating themselves
  • Showing rage or talking about seeking revenge
  • Extreme mood swings

“When Minnesotans call the suicide prevention lifeline, United Way specialists listen with empathy, assess the crisis and risk, de-escalate callers and connect them to local support and resources to help them develop a safety plan.”

– Carolina De Los Rios, United Way’s Mental Health and Suicide Prevention Program Officer

Impact Stories

We Can All Help Prevent Suicide: National Suicide Prevention Week and Month

Suicide Prevention Lifeline: Moving from Pain to Possibilities

Greater Twin Cities United Way launches new lifeline, reports thousands of calls in June alone